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Full text of "Long_Island_Forum_Volume_19_"

LONG I SLAND 

FORUM 




Grace Episcopal Churchy Whltestone, of which Francis Lewis, Signer, Was Vestryman 

( See next p39^) 



TABLE of CONTENTS 



LOSS OF THE BARK. PACIFIC 
"COLD SPRINC/S" WIRE SERVICE 
FROSTFISHINC, BY THE HANDFUL 
ROADS, STAGES AND TAVERNS 
THE BLACKWELL HOMESTEAD 



LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 



William E. (jlovcr 

Aiulnis T. Valentine 

Julian Denton Smith 

Kate W. Strong;' 

Hildegardc Lemcke 



MARCH 195() 



S2.II11 :i \ear hy Mail; Single Copies 25c 



vol,. XIX, No. .< 



H. E. Swezey & Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Midiile Country Rd., Eastport 

Telephones 
Rivei-head 2350 Eastport 250 



1 >ouden-Knickeibocker 
Hall 

A I'rivate Sanitarium for 
Nervous and Mental Diseases 

81 Louden Ave. Amityville 
AMityville 4-0053 



Farmingdale 
Individual Laundry 

Dry Cleaning - Laundering 
Rug Cleaning 

Broad Hollow Koad Farminptdale 

Phone FArminKdale 2-0300 



Chrysler - Plymouth 

Sales and Service 

M U LLER 
Automobile Corp. 

Merrick Road and Broadway 
AMityville 4-2028 and 4-2029 



BRAKES RELINED 

on Passenger Cars and Trucks 

Power Brake Sales Service 

Suffolk County Brake Service 

314 Medford Avenue, Patohogue 

Tel. 1722 



FURNITURE 
8. B. HORTON CO. 

(Establiihed 1862) 

821 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. 154 




SCHWARZ 

FLORIST 

PHONE 

FArmingdale 2-0816 



SUNRISE 

Division Household Fuel Corp 

^Blue Coar 

Fuel Oil 

Amityville Farmingdale 
1060 12 

Lindenhurst 

178 



THE 

LcNe ISLANC) 

Published Monthly ftt 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

FOR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 

Entered as second-class matter May Jl. 1947, at the 
post otfice at Amityvilie. New York, under the Act of 
March J, 1879. 

Tel. AMityville 4-0554 

Paul Bailey, Publisher-Editor 

Contributinff Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willev, Ph.D. 

John C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Robert R. Coles 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 

Francis Lewis, Signer 

I read a story in our Diocesan 
paper "Tidings" that I have not 
seen in any other paper. December 
30 last, the 152d anniversary of 
the death of Francis Lewis of 
Whitestone, one of Long Island's 
Signers of the Declaration of In- 
dependence, was named Francis 
Lewis Day, by legislative resolu- 
tion. 

Accordingly a flagpole erected 
on the lawn of Grace Episcopal 
Church, which stands on the site 
of his 200-acre farm, was dedicated 
with an address by Supreme Court 
Justice Charles S. Golden, a mem- 
ber of the church and president of 
The Bowne House Association 
which maintains Flushing's "Shrine 
to Religious Freedom." 

Among those present was Mrs. 
Francis Lewis Bledsoe of Southold, 
a descendant of Francis Lewis and 
of General Morgan Lewis, one 
time State Governor, son of the 
Signer. 

■The story stated that Francis 
Lewis was a vestryman of St. 
George's Church at Flushing but 
made no mention of Trinity in 
New York of which he also served 
as vestryman during his latter 
years. 

It seems to me that this event 
should be made a matter of record 
in the files of the Forum. 

John Tooker 

Babylon 



That Samp Mortar Headstone 

Upon reading the letter from 
Miss Rosetta TeiTy of Patchogue 
(January Forum) concerning the 
samp mortar headstone in the 
cemetery at Southold, I asked a 
friend, Mr. Jay Young of Mineola, 
to accompany me to the cemetery 
and take a picture of it. I herewith 
enclose the result. The headstone 
is that of Charles Floyd Smith. 
Jav M. Glover ' 
Southold 

Relative to the samp moi'tar 
headstone to which Miss Rosetta 
Terry made reference in the Janu- 
ary Forum, I quote what I said in 
the October 1946 L. I. Forum: 

Contimietl on page 48 



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Rue and Furniture Cleaning 



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Coal and Fuel Oils 

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Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St. Tel. 1086 Ulip 



CASH AND CARRY 

Service 15% Off 

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AMityville 4-1348 
Dixon Avenue Copiague 



AMITY AUTO SALES 
Chevrolet Agency 

For Sales and Service 

Parts and Accessories 

Merriciv and County Line Koads 

Tel. Amityville 4-0909-4-0910 



FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 

Storage Warehouse 

Your Furniture and Appliance Store 

186 Maple St. Phone 31 ISLIP. L. I. 
Established 1919 



Highest Grade 

MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Oueirolo, Prop. 

At the Triangle Amityville 

AMityville 4-0212 



LEIGH'S TAXICABS 

MOTOR VANS - STORING 
WAREHOUSE 

Auto Buses For Hire 
AMityville 4-022'5 

Near Amityvile Depot 



4^ 



MARCH li)5(; 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



L^oss of the ^ark I acific 



'T*HE whaling bark Pacific 
-*■ was a strange ship. Pur- 
chased from New Bedford 
brokers, she was brought to 
Sag Harbor by her new own- 
ers in 1864. Casual observa- 
tion of the dull black whaler 
failed to reveal anything to 
distinguish her from other 
vessels of the same category. 
There was, however, an inde- 
finable "something" about this 
whaleship. The crew could 
"feel" it. The bark was des- 
tined to become an ill-starred 
craft. In sailor's parlance, the 



William E. Glover 

vessel was "an unlucky" ship. 
Following a thorough re-fit- 
ting, the Pacific essayed to go 
awhaling, but each attempt 
proved abortive until her 
third try, when fate inter- 
vened for the last time at 
Behring's Island, in the Arctic 
Sea, where the ship was total- 
ly wrecked. 

When the unlucky Pacific 
cleared Sag Harbor on July 
26, 1864, in command of Capt. 
Samuel Pierson, of Bridge- 



hampton, she was already em- 
barked upon a series of mis- 
adventures. Officers and crew 
personnel were comprised 
chiefly of men from the Cap- 
tain's home-town and en- 
virons. 

After weeks of sailing, the 
Pacific made her first port of 
call when she put into Per- 
nambuco, Brazil. While there, 
Capt. Pierson fell desperately 
ill and died. A veteran whaler, 
Capt. Pierson had followed 
the sea since boyhood, and in- 
numerable exploits had taken 




r^ 




Fast to a Whale 

From 1953 Xmas Card of Douqias and Victoria Gardner, Sag Harbor 



4< 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 105fi 



him to many distant places 
around the globe. But now his 
voyaging was over, and they 
buried Capt. Pierson in far- 
off Pemambuco. The vessel 
was sent back to Sag Harbor 
by the American Consulate, 
and returned from the sad 
mission early in November of 
that year. If "coming events 
cast their shadows before 
them," certainly the Pacific's 
maiden voyage presaged om- 
inous portent. 

Persevering and undaunted, 
the bark Pacific cleared Sag 
Harbor again on Nov. 29th, 
1864, under command of Capt. 
Henry Huntting, of Bridge- 
hampton, bound for the 
Northwest Coast. The writer's 
mother, now 89, vividly re- 
calls Capt. Henry Huntting as 
"a massive man, of towering 
height, very closely approach- 
ing six feet, five inches." It 
would be difficult to believe 
that this imposing shipmas- 
ter's orders were ever remote- 
ly challenged! 

On approaching the "Horn," 
foul weather sprung up and 
mountainous seas prevailed. 
The doughty whaleship Paci- 
fic rolled, ploughed and wal- 
lowed. The albatross of ill- 
luck, apparently, still pursued 
her and an atmosphere of 
grim foreboding hovered over 
the laboring vessel. Then, 
when directly off the Cape, 
the full fury of the storm was 
visited upon them! 

When the gale had subsided 
the Pacific was "bloody, but 
not bowed." Excepting for the 
fact several small boats had 
been swept away, her bow- 
sprit gone, and foretopm'st 
toppled, the "unlucky ship" 
was still seaworthy. There 
was a note of considerable 
consolation in Capt. Hunt- 
ting's later observation: "Had 
we lost our spars earlier in the 
storm, we could not have sur- 
vived." 

Under jury rig, the vessel 
limped home in May, 1865. 
The following August the Pa- 
cific sailed again, in command 
of Capt. Smith French. This 
voyage, she kept a rendez- 
vous with complete and total 

Continued on page 5'i 



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Designers and Manufacturers of the 

Cougar S2F Suh Killer 
and the Albatross 



Airplanes for the U. S. Navy and the Air Force 



WILLIAM A. NICHOLSON 
Vice President 



JOHN E. NICHOLSON 
President 



Nicholson & Galloway 

Established 1849 
Roofing and Waterproofing 

Difficult commissions accepted to correct wall and roof 
leaks in schools, churches, banks, public buildings, etc. 



426 East 110th Street 

New York City 

LEhigh 4-2076 



Cedar Swamp Road 
Brookville, L. 1. 
BRookville 5-002U 



LONG ISLAND 

is located advantageously for light industry. 

Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
conditions. 

Independent Textile Dyeing Co., Inc. 

FARMJNGDALE. N. Y. 



44 



MARCH I'jriC 



LONG ISLANP FORUM 



(^old Jpring^sKJlJire jervice^ 



/^ VER our teacups we found 
^^ a common interest, com- 
munications ; especially that 
transmitted via key and code. 
I had enjoyed "CW" as an 
amateur radio operator; Miss 
Eva Wright had "pounded 
brass" at the Cold Spring 
Harbor telegraph office for 
fifty years, and from our ex- 
citing session of reminiscing 
came the following bit of vil- 
lage history. 

If you wanted to send a 
message out of Cold Spring 
prior to the late 1870's, you 
could get the fastest service 
by hitching up your best 
trotter to the family buggy 
and jogging over to Laurel- 
ton Hall on the Oyster Bay 
side of the harbor. Once you 
had topped Moore's Hill you 
could follow the telegraph 
^^ poles down through Laurel 
^^ Hollow to the beach and to 
the large three-storied hotel 
built by Dr. Oliver H. Jones. 
This was the nearest tele- 
graph office for Cold Spring 
folk. Its operator was Stephen 
Leek and the hotel was man- 
aged by the Gerards. 

At that time the business 
section of Cold Spring was 
along the east shore starting 
with the Hewlett-Jones Com- 
pany gristmill, which was 
powered by water from the 
lower mill pond via a mill-race 
along the road's edge skirting 
the inner harbor meadows. 
Next to the mill, with a car- 
riage shed in between, was 
that institution most marvel- 
ous to all village children, the 
general store. This one, man- 
aged by Walter R. Hewlett, 
was the center of most of the 
village activities. 

The 'Liberty Pole' was in 
the center of the turnaround 
in front of the store. From 
there northward along the 
' bulkheaded eastern shore 

were the homes of Captain 
George Walters, Captain Jim 
Wright, the library and fire- 



lAndrus T. Valentine 

house, the blacksmith shop, 
the wheelwright, the resi- 
dence of Mr. Will White, the 
barbershop and, across the 
road, Van Ausdall's Hotel 
next to the Thespian Hall. 

Schooners and sloops with 
coastal cargoes kept the whar- 
ves and slips humming with 
activity. Captain Jim 
Wright's house was at the 
head of the long wharf just 
north of the store; his two 
daughters, Annie and Eva, 
were fairly constant custom- 
ers at the hard candy counter. 

About 1875 Walter R. Hew- 
lett, of the Hewlett-Jones 'in- 
dustries', decided that the vil- 
lage of Cold Spring should 
have its own telegraph office 
and that its logical location 
was the general store next to 
the mill. The telegraph com- 
pany didn't believe the volume 
of message handling would 
pay for the installation. The 
use of the telegraph by sum- 
mer-boarders at the hotels 
guaranteed a very profitable 
I'eturn for its investment in 
poles and wire to such loca- 
tions; but in the case of the 
Cold Spring store they told 
Hewlett that if he wanted an 



office he would have to stand 
all the costs. 

Mr. Hewlett not only 
erected poles and stretched 
wire from a junction in 
Laurel Hollow at his own ex- 
pense, he also hired Stephen 
Leek away from the Laurel- 
ton Hall office to become Cold 
Spring's first operator. The 
Gerards were not too pleased. 
The telegraph proved its 
worth and became an integral 
part of the mill and store bus- 
iness. Later George LaRue 
succeeded Mr. Leek as opera- 
tor. 

Mr. Hewlett had heard that 
some females made cracker- 
jack operators, so he selected 
Miss Annie Wright for train- 
ing and sent her to Oyster 
Bay to learn code and mes- 
sage handling under the tutel- 
age of Evie Baylis. When 
Annie took over the Cold 
Spring telegraph office, it was 
moved to the house just north 
of Captain Jim's home. Here 
was the new public library, 
and in a lean-to attached, was 
the 'Phoenix Pumper.' Miss 
Eva remembers the childhood 
thrills of watching the Cold 
Spring Vamps in their red 
shirts and leather helmets run 
the hand-pumper from its 




Glenada Castle, Built 1853 
Became Cold Spring's Glenada Hotel 



45 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH lOSfi 



shed to the Liberty Pole in 
front of the General Store. 
Pumping- from the mill-race, 
they would endeavor to lift 
their stream over the thirty- 
foot pole. Ironically, both the 
buildings at the practice site 
were destroyed by fire, the 
store in 1896 and the mill in 
1921. 

Eva Wright started to pick 
up Morse code quite early in 
life by hanging around her 
sister at the library. Soon 
Annie had an apt pupil on her 
hands and it wasn't long be- 
fore there was a relief opera- 
tor available. It was well that 
i' happened in that manner, 
for in the early 1880's the 
Gerards established the Glen- 
ada Hatel on the east side of 
the harbor, near the present 
Beach Club, and tried to have 
the Cold Spring telegraph 
office moved there. Walter R. 
Hewlett would not relinquish 
it. So a private office was es- 
tablished at the Casino of the 
hotel for use by its guests, 
and the Gerards succeeded in 
hiring Miss Annie Wright as 
operator! She ran the office 
at the hotel in the summer 
and one in the city during the 
winter. Eva was ready and 
waiting to take over the Cold 
Spring office at the Library. 

About 1890, Dr. Oliver L. 
Jones repossessed a small 
building in Huntington 
through a mortgage transac- 



tion, and moved it to Cold 
Spring. (It is now a barber- 
shop) Dr. Jones had the tele- 
graph office moved there, and 
soon afterward the post office 
(John Dole postmaster) was 
crowded into the small build- 
ing. Miss Eva ended up by 
occupying a cramped corner 
behind a battered desk. It 
didn't appear that anyone 
could possibly crowd any more 
income producing enterprise 
into such a small space — but 
Doctor Jones could! In 1900, 
Cold Spring's first telephone 
pay-station was jammed into 
another corner, and Eva had 
to answer incoming calls. This 
caused no end of trouble, as 
callers from outside the vil- 
lage would ask her to deliver 
messages all over town. 

The next location of the 
telegraph office was in the 
building west of the Lock- 
wood home and store on Main 
Street. Mame (Mary) Lock- 
wood had been librarian there 
until her marriage in 1908. At 
that time Eva took over her 
job as librarian, and moved in 
her telegraph key also. 

Telegraph traffic probably 
reached its height shortly 
after Otto H. Kahn, the well 
known international banker, 
built and occupied his 'castle' 
(now the site of Eastern Mili- 
tary Academy) overlooking 
the harbor. Miss Eva recalls 

C'ontiniietl on page S3 



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Fostoria Tiffin Duncan 

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Wines & Liquors 

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Delves Liquor Store 

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201 Bway., AMityville 4-0033 



J 



46 



MARCH 195fi 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



cTrostfishing ^y the Jiandful 



THE 7th of December 1955 
paid off the frostfisher- 
men. It is a date to be remem- 
bered for that day frostfish 
put in an appearance the like 
of which had not been seen 
for years. 

I always hesitate to mention 
frostfishing even though it is 
an ancient rite on Long Island. 
The narrating of honest-to- 
goodness accounts of frost- 
fishing always brings laughter 
and mild ridicule similar to 
that encouraged by the most 
preposterous fish story. And 
thus with this article I might 
as well prepare myself for the 
"tumult and the shouting." 

For a day or two before De- 
cember 7th rumors had been 
seeping up from the beach 
that the frostfish were being 
caught and that they seemed 
to be in good numbers. Pros- 
pective fishermen formed lit- 
tle groups and arranged car 
pools to get down to the shore. 
I had a meeting of the Nassau 
County Historical Socety 
scheduled for that night over 
in Westbuiy. I dressed imme- 
diately after supper and drove 
down to Jones Beach to watch 
the fishing. None of the 
groups of fellows I wanted to 
find had arrived — at least 



Julian Dento}! Smith 

none was in Field No. 1. So I 
took my flashlight and hiked 
to the oceanfront. A father 
and son passed me on the way 
back to their car dragging a 
heavy burlap bag and carrying 
two garden rakes. That surely 
looked like good fishing to me ! 

At the water's edge I still 
could not find any of the men 
I had expected and I flashed 
my light back and forth along 
the advancing waves as they 
slid up the beach. These were 
sort of practice shots with the 
light, nothing very serious 
about them. Suddenly the 
light picked out a fish strand- 
ed on the sand awaiting the 
next wave to get back to the 
sea. I did not have even a pair 
of rubbers over my shoes, but 
the fish was up the beach far 
enough that I got him without 
mu.ch more than moistening 
the soles of my shoes. Having 
nothing to put him in, no pail, 
no sack, no basket — as I had 
not planned to do any fishing, 
I threw him up beyond the 
reach of the waves. 

I worked the edges of a few 
more waves and before I 
knew it another fish shovi^ed 
on the sand, and I got him. 



too. These were whiting and 
about 15 or 16 inches long. I 
had to bring them back to the 
car and had only hands to do 
it. It is a long walk and the 
night was cold, so good, fur- 
lined gloves swung a fish on 
either side of me and held 
each off that my flapping Duf- 
fer coat would not brush them 
to appropriate a fish smell. 
The flashlight was jammed in 
a pocket. I put the fish on the 
floor of the trunk and went 
back for more. 

In driving to the mainland 
I stopped at the tool booth to 
give the attendant a couple of 
fish for we had kidded about 
the frostfishing when I came 
down through the toll. My fish 
went to Westbury with me and 
were cleaned and prepared af- 
ter I returned home. They 
were delicious at supper the 
next night. 

My experience was no iso- 
lated case as it was repeated 
time and time again that 
night all along Jones Beach 
from the Inlet to Cedar Beach. 
One chap I know picked up a 
bushel basket of frostfish. 
Others were satisfied with a 
pailful. Everyone seemed to 
get whiting and about the size 

Contimird on pag-t* 58 



n 




Hemlock Beach Lifesaving Station in the I890's 



47 



(,ONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH li)5(i 



Samp Mortar Headstone 

Cont nued from Page 42 
"Near the east end of Willow 
Hill Cemetery in the western part 
of Southold village, there stands a 




Charles Floyd Smith's Headstone 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 
Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losi's 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
ville. 



POWELL 

Funeral Home, Inc. 

67 Broadway 
Amityville, New York 

AMityville 4-0172 

Monumental Work 



samp mortar minus the pounder 
and sweep to mark the last resting' 
place of Charles Floyd Smith. It 
is a granite mortar and formerly 
stood in the yard of its owner at 
Cutchogue. In his will he directed 
that the mortar should be inverted 
when relocated in the cemetery as 
his gravestone. However, those who 
arranged for his unique memorial 
wisely disregarded his testamen- 
tary wish and set the ever durable 
samp mortar fii'mly on its base as 
it was designed to stand. There it 
will doubtless remain throughout 
the ages serving as a bathtub for 
enumerable generations of feath- 
ered creatures, and as a relic of 
one of Long Island's most practical 
institutions." 

Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 
Senior Contributing Editor 

For more than a generation pre- 
oeding his death in 1924, Charles 
Floyd Smith was a well-known 
farmer, horse-trainer and an auc- 
tioneer of repute throughout east- 
ern Southold Township. 

Usually driving a team of spirit- 
ed horses before a two-wheel cart, 
"Charlie Floyd" (as intimates 
knew him), always cut quite a 
figure dashing through town! Pos- 
sessing an average education, 
nevertheless he had at his com- 
mand an eloquent — almost ency- 
clopedic vocabulary, which served 
him well in auctioneering. He 
could sell anything from a farm 
and stock, to a lady's diary! De- 
liberate in motion, he was equally 



The Barth-Hamilton 
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134A Broadway Amityville 

AM 4-1688 AM 4-3140 



Schrafel Motors, Inc. 

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NEW and USED CARS 

Merrick Road, West Amityville 

Leo F, Schrafel AM 4-23 06 



so in his quiet, precise and erudite 
speech. Affecting a neatly-trimmed 
mustache and carefully cropped 
beard, some saw in Mr. Smith's 
physiognomy a startling resem- 
blance to that of the renowned 
scientist, Charles Darwin. 

No auction under the auspices 
of Charles F. Smith was really 
authentic unless a clear cut of his 
features appeared in an upper cor- 
ner of the advertising posters! As 
an erstwhile printer's devil on a 
local paper, I recall one occasion 
when, inadvertantly, we failed to 
insert his likeness. Mr. Smith ob- 
served in withering tones, "No 
picture? — Preposterous! With- 
out it, there can be no auction." 
The posters had to be run over 
again, this time WITH the pic- 
ture. Needless to say, more care 
was exercised in future. 

Wilson L. Glover 

Southold 



It is a pleasure to renew my 
subscription to the Forum. I know 
something of what it is to get it 
together and sift it out. Best 
wishes to Dr. Wood. David M. 
Griswold, Silver Springs, Md. 



E. CLAYTON SMITH 

Established 1913 

Jobber-Replacement Parts 

Tools - Equipment 

218-220 East Main St. 
Babylon Tel. MO 9-0.551 



The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Judee Charles S. Golden. President 
presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Religion Freedom 

ADMISSION FREE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 6 P.M 

Sponsored by 

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First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

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Phone CHapel 9-2000 



FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



J 



48 



MARC'H 195(; 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^^^sQCidsy Jtages and ''Gaverns 



r^ 



T HAVE been asked a number 
■*■ of times to write more 
about old roads. A number of 
years ago the late Mrs. Ed- 
ward P. Buffet wrote a long 
article about Smithtown 
Township which she read be- 
fore the National Society of 
the D. A. R. It was later print- 
ed in the Port Jefferson Times. 
Recently a friend kindly 
copied this from an old copy 
of the Times. Part two of this 
article was about early roads 
and from it I have taken some 
interesting items. 

Governor Nichols was the 
first one to plan a road from 
Southampton to Brooklyn and 
it was finished in Governor 
Andros' time. Mrs. Buffet 
here quotes from Onderdonk's 
"Long Island in the Olden 
Times": 

"March 5th, 1772. — A stage 
will run from Brooklyn Ferry 
to Samuel Nicolls' on Hemp- 
stead Plains, where passen- 
gers will stay all night, fare, 
four shillings. To Epenetus 
Smith's at Smithtown, four 
shillings. To Benjamin 
Havens' in St. George's Manor, 
four shillings, and stay all 
night. To Nathan Fordham's, 
Sag Harbor, six shillinfrs. 
Thus a passenger may be con- 
veyed 120 miles in three days 
and over a pleasant road for 
18 shillings." 

Horses were changed near 
the Head of the River at an 
inn kept by a man named 
Jean. The place is called 
'Jean's Old Lots'. The second 
night was spent at Epenetus 
Smith's in Smithtown. The 
widow Blydenburgh kept a 
house of entertainment not 
far from Epenetus. About 
forty British troopers came to 
the widow's one day, and de- 
manded dinner. "Lordy me", 
exclaimed the widow "Don't 
come to a poor, lone widow ; go 
over to 'Netus' yonder; theie 
is plenty there." The troopers 
went and, I guess, cleaned out 
his supply. (If 'Netus' found 
out that the widow had sont 



'^ite W. Strong 

them, I think he must have 
been pretty angry.) It was at 
this Widow Blydenburgh's 
that President Washington 
stayed when he made the tour 
of Long Island. 

In the year 1744, Dr. Alex- 
ander Hamilton made a jour- 
ney through Long Island. He 
names some of the inns at 
which he stopped : at Jamaica, 
the Sign of the Sun ; at Hunt- 
ington, the Half Moon and 
Heart, kept by one Plat; five 
miles east of Huntington, the 
Sign of Bacchus; at Smith- 
town, a tavern kept by a deaf 
landlady; at Setauket, in 
Brookhaven, Buchanan's. 

Mrs. Buffet tells that she 
found, in an old paper, that 
William Taylor kept an inn, in 
the western part of the town- 
ship, licensed by an order of 
Lieut. General Robertson of 
the British Army, October 1st, 
1782. The tavern bills speak 
of bowls of cherry toddy, nips 
of grog, quarts of rum, half- 
slings, etc. 

At the time that this was 
written, there was a tract of 
wilderness between the rail- 
road and the turnpike, and 
reaching from Phillips' Mill to 
the Huntington line. Indian 
Head, a small settlement in 
this district, was long the 



home of Solomon Smith and 
his descendents. It was so 
called because of a stone head, 
said to have stood on the edge 
of a pond and worshiped by 
the Indians. It disappeared, 
but no one knows exactly how 
or where. 

A little to the north of In- 
dian Head, in a hollow marked 
by some white oaks, was a 
place called Fiddlers' Green, 
thereat lived a 'yellow man' 
who played the fiddle so won- 
derfully that the rumor went 
around that he had made a 
bargain with the devil. They 
even said he had a spot on his 
side and that, when this spot 
grew to encircle him, the devil 
would claim his own. 

There was another man who 
lived still deeper in the woods 
who was said to keep, as a 
house pet, a black snake ten 
feet long. Such are a few of 
the items from Mrs. Buffet's 
article. 



Who Eats Starfish? 

Mr. Dockow's eulogy to Horse- 
shoe Crab as a delectable dish in 
the January Forum, prompts me to 
ask if he or anyone else with a 
roving appetite ever indulged in 
starfish, and if so, would he or they 
recommend broiling, frying, chow- 
der, pickled or smoked? 

(Mrs.) Anne Chovie 
(pen name) 




Blydenburgh Mouse, Smithtown, was Old Time Tavern 



4'* 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH 195fi 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 



Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4-1900 

Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wil» for 

Worth While Real Estat* 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

8393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 
yo Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Riverhcad 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnecock Bays. 



Northport 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



EASTPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Main Street EAstport S-M64 



Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union 
Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 



The only Savings Bank in 
Western Suffolk County 

Mamber Federal Depotil 
Inaurancc Corporation 



Who Knows the Composer? 

At Christ Church, Oyster Bay, a 
carol has been sung each year for 
seventy-five years, during the 
Christmas season. We all love it 
and it wouldn't be Christmas to 
many of us if it were not included 
in at least one service. Strange to 
say, none of us knows its origin. 
In passing it on to the next gen- 
eration we would like to be able 
to tell them why it has become a 
tradition. I wonder if any Forum 
reader could enlighten us. Here is 
the first stanza: 
It is Christmas Day by the river, 

It is Christmas Day by the bay 
And the soft winged snows they 
are falling 

On the ocean far away. 
From the hand of God they are 
falling. 

Snowy doves on this Christmas 
Day 
On the havened waves of the river, 

On the ocean far away. 

As one of a group engaged in 
restoring historic Raynham Hall 
here, we find the Forum very 
helpful. 

Mrs. Miner C. Hill 

Oyster Bay 



Liked Dr. Wood's Article 

I read Dr. Wood's article about 
the Rev. Moses Baldwin ("For- 
gotten Cleric of Southold," Dec. 
1955 Forum) with a great deal of 
interest. On Sunday, December 11, 
our Old First Church Bulletin con- 
tained a pleasing reference to the 
article. 

L. Barron Hill 

Southold 

Note: Supreme Court Justice 
Hill has been a subscriber to the 
Forum since its inception eighteen 
years ago. Editor. 



Upstate Treadmill 

Was much interested in the 
treadmill article in the November 
Forum and the comments by 
readers in later issues. When I was 
a boy on the farm at Stamford-in- 
the-Catskills there was a dog- 
power tread and in the milk room 
we had a dog-power sweep. What 
relics they would have made now. 
George Montgomery 

Owego, N.Y. 



Sloop Wreck of 1876 

Almost eighty years ago there 
was a tragedy in Jones Inlet 
which cost two lives. On Friday 
Nov. 10, 1876 the little sloop E.W. 
Hulse of Youngport (now Great 
River) was bound out and down 
the inlet, loaded with clams for 
the New York city market. On 
board were John Saunders, captain 
and part owner, Charles Saunders, 
his brother, and Joseph Munsell, 
brother-in-law and part owner. 
Continued on next page 



Port Washington 



Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insuranet 
EDgewood 3-0108 249 Post Ave. 



Commack 



Established — 1925 

JOHN W. NOTT 

Listings Wanted, Farms, Acreage 

Estates East of Huntington 

Jericho Turnpike at Commack, L. I. 

FOrest 8-9322 



Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgage 
Loans, Appraisals 
Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 176 



Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wyandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insurer 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic— -1-8110 



Glen Head 



M. 0. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 
25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 40491 



Bay Shore 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

83 E.Main,BayShore 7-0876 & 0877 



Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

Carleton Ave. Tel. 6317 Central Islip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



W. E. MAGEE, Inc. 

Insurance and Real Estate 

Francis B. Garvey 

Robert Snyder 

Babylon MOhawk 1-2600 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

George S. Coiyer, Secy. 
Broadway and Park Ava. 

AMityville 4-0198 



J 



5U 



MARCH 195G 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



J 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurers 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



r 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 
And 15 Forest Ave., Locust Valley. 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

For Westbury and Vicinity 

EDgewood 3-0108 249 Post Ave. 



Floral Park 



Trying to pass over the bar the 
sloop was capsized, Charles Saun- 
ders and Munsell were washed 
overboard and drowned, the clams 
were washed out of her. This was 
about seven in the morning. 

At ten the sloop Hamlet, Capt. 
Wm. Smith, from Bay Shore, pass- 
ing down the inlet saw the wreck, 
went to it and found a man ap- 
parently dead, but after an hour's 
work he was revived. This was 
John Saunders, who it seems when 
the sloop went over became tan- 
gled in the main sheet. By cling- 
ing to it he had managed to keep 
his head above water. Capt. Smith 
took him on to New York and sent 
him home by train. 

The aftermath of this was that 
John Saunders lived to a good old 
age. I think he was past ninety 
when he died at Islip, in spite of 
his terrible experience. A daugh- 
ter was born to the widow of 
Charles Saunders the following 
February and was named Jane. 
She grew up, married Benjamin F. 
Abrams, who is still around and in 
the automobile business in Hunt- 
ington, but Jane died in 1939. 
James E. Tooker 
Town Historian 

Babylon 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 

Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 

Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 

East Norwich 

RICHARD DOWNING & SONS 

Real Estate & Insurance Brokers 

North Hempstead Turnpike 

Tel. OYster Bay 6-0592 



■Benj.T.We/t' 

Real Estate Insurance 
East yfeiAUKET 

Lon^ island. New YorK 
■ Tel. 101 ScUuKct ■ 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER. Mgr. 

199-A Bro»dway AMityville 4-0376 



Miss Strong's 17th Series 

The 17th series of Miss Kate W. 
Strong's "True Tales from the 
Early Days of Long Island" has 
been reprinted in pamphlet form 
by the Long Island Forum and is 
now available at $1.25 postpaid by 
ordering directly from Miss Strong, 
"The Cedars", Setauket, N. Y. 

The edition is as usual limited 
in number and copies should 
therefore be ordered without de- 
lay by those who wish to be as- 
sured of obtaining one. The pam- 
phlet is profusely illustrated and 
attractively compiled. 

Miss Strong has been writing 
for the Forum since 1940. Today 
most of the pamphlets that have 
preceded this one have become 
items for the collector but their 
greater worth lies in the great 
wealth of source material she has 
taken from old documents and 
records which have been presei'ved 
by the author's family, in some 
cases for many generations, and 
now in her private collection. 



Thank You Very Much 

You have over the years made 
a priceless contribution to Long- 
Island in your publications. Keep 
up the good work. Generations to 
come will hold you in most grate- 
ful memory for perpetuating the 
history of our beloved island. 
George W. Hildreth 

Riverhead 

Note: Former District Attorney 
Hildreth has been a Forum sub- 
scriber since its birth more than 
18 years ago. Editor. 



East Quogue 

GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Squires Ave., East Quogue 
Tel. Hampton Bays 2-0190 

Wantagh 

W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 

Wading River 

WM. L. MILLER & SON 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Phone: Wading River 4323 

Garden City 

RLLEIXY^HpRlWrO. 

i i rir?H-r. l^*7 < r^ V>^ I I ri «i-:Ai.-r«>wsl \J 
( 7 (M-i-'ii : i:'s1 ^^ 

"Brooklyn and Long Island's LargtsI 

Real Estate Organization" 

721 Franklin Ave. PI 6-5400 



"The Fame Behind the Name" 

HARDER 

Extermination Service, Inc. 
Termite Control, Mothproof- 
ing and all other services 

Phone Nearest Office 

PAtchogue 3-2100 HUntington 4-2304 
PArk 7- 2943 IVanhoe l-b8l'0 

MOhawk 9-2020 Southampton 1-0346 
BEllport 7-0604 STony Brook 70 917 

F. Kenneth Harder Robert Troup 
President Vice-President 



Mortgage Loans 

First Mortgage Loans 
Are Our Specialty 

When you've found the 

home you would like to buy 

or build, consult us about 

financing. 

Suffolk County's 
Oldest Savings Bank 

Incorporated 1858 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, New York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



SI 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH lOBC. 



Leading Real Estate Brokers 



The Blackwell Homestead 

Whenever Welfare Island is 
mentioned, some people think of 
it as the site of a prison, but long 
before that era this narrow strip 
of land near Hell Gate in the East 
River was owned by the old Long- 
Island Blackwell family whose 
colonial homestead still stands 
there. 

Soon after the English conquest 
of New Amsterdam in 1664, the 
island became the home of Col. 



Manning who was in command of 
the Battery at the south tip of 
Manhattan. Following the recap- 
ture of New York by the Dutch 
in 1673 and the capture of En- 
glish Governor Francis Lovelace, 
the latter charged Manning with 
treason. Nevertheless, it was 
shown that Manning had only 80 
regulars to oppose 1600 Dutch 
troops which had been landed from 
28 ships in upper Manhattan, and 
that Lovelace was away at the 




Blackwell Homestead Built in I6a0s 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licen^ied Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main, by Lake MOhawk 9-0644 



Real Estate Insurance 

EDWARD F. COOK 
East Hampton 

Telephone 4-1440 



GLEN FLOORS 

FRED CAPOBIANCO 

Broadloom - Linoleum 

Tile 

Shades and Blinds 

BABYLON GLEN COVE 
HICKSVlLLE 



time of the bloodless assault, of 
which he had no knowledge until 
returning- to Manhattan sevei-al 
days later and being made a pris- 
oner of war. 

When the English again took 
over things in 1673 Manning re- 
gained his East River island home 
and there he died, leaving the 
estate to his daughter Mary who 
in 1676 married Robert Blackwell, 
a native of Worcestershire, En- 
gland, who had first settled at 
Elizabethtown, N.J., and in 1655 
become a freeholder of Newtown 
on Long Island. He was a widower 
with several children at the time of 
his marriage to Mary. A member 
of the Church of England and an 
outstanding citizen of Newtown, 
he brought Mary Manning to live 
in his fine home there. In time 
they had thirteen children. 

As the family began to increase, 
they built a home on Mary's island 
estate and soon thereafter it be- 
came known as Blackwell's Island. 
Their white three-storied farm- 
house with an ell for the kitchen 
sprawled along the riverfront. It 
was an ideal location for a home 
as the little island had its own 
meadows, bountiful with salt-hay, 
so beneficial for the cattle. There 
were fresh springs and stone quai-- 
(\>ntinut*(i nt-xt pa^e 



Miller Place 



ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 



OiiMi^CT^ 



LONG ISLAND 
REAL ESTATE 

for more than 40 years 

Main office on Main road at 
Mattituck. Tel. Mattituck 9-8434. 
Nassau County office at 1699 
>^nrthern Blvd., Manhasset. Tel. 
Manhasset 7-3646. 



Patchogue 


Estates, 


Inc. 


REA[. 


EST AT K 




160 Oak Street 


PA 


3-0372 


FRANK 


SILVERMAN 





LEON R, EDELSTEIN 

Babylon Town Real Estate 

Wanted to Purchase oiri L. I. 
Majis, Documents. 
5S0 Sunrise Highway Babylon 

Tel. MOhawk 9-1144 



Nubbell, Klapper 6- Nubbell 


LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 


65 Hilton Avenue 


Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 


Insurance 


Mori gages 


JOHN T. 


PULIS 


101 Richmond Ave 


. Amityville 


AMiiyville 


4-1489 



BELLPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Main Sireet BEIIport 7-0143 



BAYVIEW REALTY 

HOMES ALWAYS 

AVAILABLE 

409 W. Merrick Road 

Lindenhurst 

LI 5-3636 DEer Park 2-7992 



J 



52 



MARCH 1950 

The Blackwell Homestead 

Continued from page 52 

ries. Their slaves planted orchards 
and vegetable gardens and erected 
a large barn, cowsheds and a 
"cyder mill". Shade trees and gar- 
dens of herbs and oldfashioned 
flowers completed the lovely pic- 
ture. 

But with all the things they had 
on their little island, the Black- 
wells still had to cross an arm of 
the river to attend St. Jarnes 
Church at Newtown in which, in- 
cidentally, the Episcopal Church 
had its beginning on Long Island. 
There is a family tradition that in 
going to church across the shallow 
water the Blackwells used two 
large rowboats drawn by a team 
of horses, led by slaves. This was 
in keeping with the family's rather 
unusual life. Jacob Reeder, for in- 
stance, while courting daughter 
Ann Blackwell, thought nothing of 
swimming to and fro. The old 
homestead was frequently the 
scene of quilting bees, corn husk- 
ings and dances, and many a maid 
must have plighted her troth un- 
der the trees. 

The lovely old home remained in 
the family for 142 years until in 
1828 it was sold to the city for 
use as a prison. In 1929 it passed 
to the Department of Hospitals 



and its name was then changed to 
Welfare Island. But even yet, sur- 
rounded by imposing modern build- 
ings, within stone's throw of East 
River's busy traffic, there re- 
mains a certain poise and charm 
about the old homestead. When I 
visited it not too long ago I re- 
joiced that in its living-room re- 
mained the broad fireplace, the 
white wainscoting and the mahog- 
any trim of colonial days. 

If the old house could have 
talked to me, what a wealth of in- 
formation about my ancestors I 
would have obtained. 

(Miss) Hildegarde Lemcke 

Flushing- 



Cold Spring's 

Continued From Page 46 

that she handled a steady flow 
of coded cables in addition to 
straight messages for the 
family. In order that the 
Kahns might count upon un- 
interrupted service, they had 
a key cut in for her at her 
home, which was then on 
Main Street opposite Turkey 
lane. The Wrights had built 
there in 1894. 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

When the new brick library 
was opened to the public on 
March 13, 1913 at its present 
location, Miss Eva was again 
behind the desk as librarian 
and telegraph operator. Her 
sounder and key functioned 
for the village until 1930, 
when the office was discon- 
tinued by Western Union and 
traffic from and for Cold 
Spring Harbor was handled 
through the Huntington 
office. Miss Eva Wright re- 
mained as librarian until 1953. 
Cold Spring Harbor's his- 
tory gratefully records Eva 
Wright's lifetime of depend- 
able service as its telegrapher 
and librarian. 



Liked Miss Overton's Story 

I was interested in the article 
on Sarah Rapelje (by Marion F. 
Overton, in September 1955 Forum) 
who was the sister of my great- 
great - great - great - great - 
great - great - grandfather, Je- 
ronemus de Rapalye. 

Mrs. Jasena Rappleye Foley, 
Syracuse 



MORTGAGE MONEY 

HOME OWNERS 



Mortgage Loans to refinance existing mortgages 
or to purchase and/ or renovate homes 



INDIVIDUAL MORTGAGE HOLDERS 

Existing mortgages purchased or refinanced 

RIVERHEAD SAVINGS BANK 



RIVERHEAD. N. Y. 



RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



5.< 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



MARCH l!)r)(; 



m 









J 



Isabel McLauchlan 



Pajama Girl 

Pajamas aren't the trite, old- 
timey sleeping togs they once were. 
Due to a former Traphagen student 
now a successful designer, a zing- 
has been added . . . young girls 
love the casual rather than bed- 
time look and older sisters like it 
too. They are just as big a hit 
as "Pajama Game," the Broad- 
way show the makers of these 
slumber fashions so successfully 
"pajamaed." 

A Canadian girl, Isabel Mc- 



NEWL 



so-x 



— OO '; 



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sensitive Permaphone®. smooth-flow 
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Ont-r.or V/arroKly, fiV.-y.or Striis, Hai 



PICKUP & BROWN 

GUILD OPTICIANS 

18 Deer Park Ave. Babylon 

Tel. IVlOhawk 9-0927 



Lauchlan, who came to New York 
to study at the Traphagen School 
of Fashion, graduated in 1954 right 
into a job as designer for Lubin- 
Weeker Company, manufacturers 
of Weldon Pajamas which is the 
trade-name under which these 
nighttime styles are sold. Isabel 
found both career and romance — 
she is now Mrs. Donald E. 
Messinger. 

Examples of her designs are in- 
cluded in the 1955-56 section ot 
the over-a-thousand costumes in 
the Traphagen Museum Collection. 
The pajamas are the gift oi the 
manufacturer to the school. Some 
pieces from the collection are al- 
ways on view in constantly changed 
displays at Traphagen, 1680 Broad- 
way (at 52nd St.), New York, an J 
these exhibits are open to visitors 
without charge. 



Rare L. I. Books 

If interested in any of these 
items, write the Long Island 
Forum, Amityville, N. Y. 

Gabriel's Evolution of Long 
Island, 194 pages, folded map, 
published by Yale 1921. 

Thompson's Long Island, 2nd 
edition, two volumes, 1843. 

Refugees of 1776 from L.I. to 
Ct., Mather. 

In Old Southampton, Abigail 
Fithian Halsey. 

Personal Reminiscences of Men 
and Things on L.I., by Daniel M. 
Tredwell, two volumes, 1912. 

Social History of Flatbush by 
Gertrude Lefferts Vanderbilt, 1909. 

Thompson's History of Long Is- 
land, first edition, 1839, one volume. 



SAVE 



With Insured Safety 
With Convenience 

OPEN AN ACCOUNT TODAY 



BiY Shore FiGRiLtes 



tmd SSum >. 4 » Mc i a<i <m 



54 



MARCH 195f. 

Loss of Bark Pacific 

Continued from page 44 

disaster. On July 3, 1866, the 
Pacific piled up on a reef in 
the Arctic (or Behring) Sea. 

In accounting to the ship's 
Sag Harbor owners Capt. 
Smith French reported the 
wreck of the Pacific as fol- 
lows : 

"In a dense fog we struck 
twice, very lightly; immedi- 
ately luffed to by the wind, 
but in about fifteen minutes 
she brought up on the bottom. 
Every possible exertion was 
made to get her off by carry- 
ing out anchors, and breaking 
out aft to lighten the ship. 
But it was all in vain, as the 
tide was falling faster than 
we could lighten the vessel. 

"At 2 p.m. the fog lifted 
sufficiently for us to see the 
land- The Pacific was on a 
reef, or rocky point of Beh- 
ring's Island, about one mile 
off shore. We must have had 
a very strong current setting 
on the W.N.W., as our course 
through the night was from 
two to four points off shore. 

"At 5 p.m. the tide had fal- 
len so that she fell over to 



port and bilged. By 7 p.m. 
there was five feet of water in 
the hold. Throughout the 
night we got together some 
twenty-five barrels of provi- 
sions, three casks of bread, 
spare spars, light sails, etc. 
which we took ashore on the 
morning of July 4th. At 2 p.m. 
of that day all hands left the 
ship for shore. We erected a 
large tent and prepared to 
make ourselves as comfort- 
able as possible under the cir- 



Blomquist Laundry 

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11 Cottage Row Glen Cove 

Tel. Glen Cove 4-1105 

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Since 1900 



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LONG ISLAND FORUM 

cumstances. Thence we were 
employed as follows: 

"July 5 — Busily engaged in 
getting what we had saved 
to higher land in a more se- 
cure place. Did not encounter 
any inhabitants of the island. 

"July 6 — At 8 a.m. men in 
three boats started out to lo- 
cate any inhabitants. The 
third mate, Mr. Chester S. 
Hoadley, was left at the camp 
with eleven men to build up 
one of the boats, that we 




Sc^^iX^^CyAlI^Zum*^^^ 



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_3% PER ANNUM 

_2V2% PER ANNUM 




CHARTERED 1889 



INTEREST-DIVIDENDS COMPOUNDED SEMI-ANNUALLY 

SAVINGS RECEIVED BY lOTH OF MONTH EARN DIVIDENDS 

FROM THE 1ST OF THE SAME MONTH 

SAFETY OF YOUR SAVINGS INSURED UP TO SIO.OOO BY THE 

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SAVE-BY-MAIL - POSTAGE PAID BOTH WAYS 



"Long Island Whalers" 

By Paul Bailey 

The history of whaling by L. I. ships and men for 
more than 200 years, briefly told. Showing the begin- 
r.ing, the rise, the peak and the decline and finish of 
the industry between the 1640's and 1870's. Well illus- 
trated. Postpaid $1. 

Address LONG ISLAND FORUM, Box 805, Amityville 



55 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

might make the passage 
across to the mainland if nec- 
essary. Went up the east coast 
around to the north side of 
the island. At 5 p.m. we es- 
pied huts and people. We 
pulled in and landed at a small 
fishing village. Our party were 
very kindly received by these 
natives, who proceeded to in- 
form us by signs that the 
principal town was on the 
west side of the island, but 



that it would be most danger- 
ous to go around in the dark- 
ness of night. A messenger 
was dispatched to the town 
and the Governor arrived at 
10 p.m. He informed us that 
a ship was due from Sitka in 
five days. 

"July 7— At 8 a.m., accom- 
panied by the Governor and 
forty natives, we started by 
an island route for the chief 
town on the west side. By dint 



From Today's Planning 



MARCH in5(; 

of wading and poling, track- 
ing and lugging, we reached 
our destination at 7 p.m. Once 
we had to unload the boats 
and carry them on men's 
shoulders more than two miles 
over a steep hill or small 
mountain. The feat would 
have occupied us at least two 
days without the aid of the 
natives. On arrival at the 
town, preparations had been 
made to receive us in the 



Comes Tomorrow's Progress... 



J 



Here are Just a few tangible ex- 
amples of Security National's never- 
ending program to carry out its 
philosophy of planning for tomorrow 
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to the growing area we serve. 

14 strategic locations now serve 
over 100,000 Security National cus- 
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broader meaning to the word service, 



with enlarged and modern facilities 
. . . with three drive-in locations. 

Today Security National has re- 
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an organization of over 300 people. 
We are proud of our facilities, proud 
of our stability and size, proud of our 
close relationship with so many cus- 
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continued sound economic develop- 
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J 



One m 5 Suffolk County Families says: 
"Security National is my bank." 




14 Confe//ie>/t Offices 





„^ fVormerly First Suffolk National Bank) 



AMITYVIUE CENTER MORICHES EAST NORTHPORT HUNTINGTON nNDENHURST PO-IT JcfFfRSON ROCKY POINT 

•ABYION COPIAOUE EASTPORT ISLIP NORTHPORT PORT JEFFERSON STATION WEST BABYIOM 

Member Federal Deposit Insuronce Corporation 



So 



MARCH 1956 

shape of a good warm supper, 
with a house for the men. 
There was plenty good, fresh 
fish for them. With my of- 
ficers, I had accommodations 
in the Governor's Mansion and 
we all dined at his table. 

"July 8 — Rainy, very bad 
weather. 

"July 9 — Mr. Sayre, with a 
native guide, started over- 
land for our camp near the 
ship. 

"July 11 — The native re- 
turned". Mr. Sayre, he re- 
ported, was so lame he could 
scarcely walk. 

"July 12 — Sent our boats 
around the island to the camp 
to fetch provisions. 

"July 14 — In company with 
the Governor, I crossed the 
island back to our camp, and 
returned on the 15th. Mr. 
Hoadley had the boat finished 
and said he would bring all 
supplies, provisions, etc., 
around to us within two days. 
"July 16 — A sail in sight, 
and working into the harbor. 
At 3:30 p.m. boarded bark 
Wakemoff, Capt. Arkimande- 
trofF, who very kindly con- 
sented to transport myself 
and ship's company to Sitka. 
He informed us that although 
he had very little room, he 
felt impelled to take us as it 
would be quite impossible for 
us to remain on the island all 
winter. He would sail in three 
days. 

"July 17 — At 3 p.m. the 
cooper arrived from camp. He 
stated that on the previous 
morning Mr. Hoadley, with 
the other men at the camp, 
had started with two boats 
loaded with provisions and 
clothing, for the coast of 
Kamschatka. He informed me 
further that all my books, 
charts, and greater part of 
my clothing had been left on 
the beach. As there was not 
time to procure these items 
before the ship sailed, we 
were forced to leave them. 

"July 29 — We sailed from 
Behring's Island. Arrived Sit- 
ka August 23rd. 

"October 17 — Sailed for 
Honolulu on board the brig 



Constantine, Capt. Dengin. As 
space was limited, myself, 
first mate, second mate, coop- 
er and two of the crew took 
passage ; the remainder of the 
crew will come in another ves- 
sel." 

One of Sag Harbor's most 
illustrious whaling voyagers, 
Capt. Smith French remained 
a whaleship master until the 
very last period of that once 
great industry. He was a 
brother of Hannibal and Ste- 
phen B. French, noted ship- 
ping agents and owners. Capt. 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Smith French died on August 
10, 1882, barely three weeks 
after his friend, Capt. James 
L. Austin, who passed on July 
20th of that year. 

It is indeed a privilege and 
pleasure to receive your most in- 
teresting publication. Mrs. Louis 
E. Harfin, Jamesport. 



PETERS 
Delicatessen 

Tel. Amity villa 4-1350 

176 Park Ave. Amityville 



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Habit 

with 

NICOLEX 

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In 10 to 14 Days ! 

MAIL $2.00 TO: 

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35 Bennett PL Amityville 



STATE BANK OF SUFFOLK 



THREE OFFICES 

AMITYVILLE BAY SHORE BRENTWOOD 



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Broadway and Avon Place Phones 1174 - 2095 Amityville 



57 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Frostfishing 

Continued from page 47 

of the ones I had. I heard of 
very few ling being caught. 

As far as I can learn three 
fish are considered frostfish — 
ling, whiting and tomcod. On 
the beaches we find the ling 
and whiting; the tomcod ap- 
pear in the Sound and the 
Hudson. The ling are usually 
mixed in with the whiting. 
They have a few whiskers 
something like fresh - water 
bullheads. They do not have 
as good flavor as whiting; 
there is more of the cod taste. 
Tomcods are fished for, they 
do not lend themselves to the 
land operation of the other 
two frostfish. I went over to a 
wharf in Flushing to observe 
tomcod fishing. Hooks are 
baited and lowered into the 
water about every yard on 
both sides of the pier. Each 
line is equipped with a small 
piece of wire bent in such a 
way that the line passes 
through and, under gentle 
pressure, jingles a little bell 
supported by the wire. The 
fishermen set the lines and 
then take refuge from the 
chilling wind in back of shan- 
ties, crates and pilino;- on the 
wharf. Whenever a bell tinkles 
all hands rush out and tend 
the lines. The tomcod are 
smaller than ling and whiting. 
Many times as younTst^rs. 
my brother and I have gone 
frost-fish'np- with m" fat^^ei* 
at Far Rockaway. We wore 
high boots, nuttino: them on 
at home and walking to the 
beach a mile and a half awav 
— that was before automo- 
biles. We pulled along a little 
express wagon in which were 
scapnets, burlap bags and a 
kerosene lantern for each per- 
son. No one knew about elec- 
tric flashlights then. 

We came on to the beach at 
Roche's Baths, a bathing pa- 
vilion at the foot of Broad- 
way. Sometimes we crossed to 
the oceanfront by way of the 
trestle, a wooden structure 
used by the open-air trolleys 
that operated during the sum- 
mer months between the Far 
Rockaway railroad station and 
the beach. 



I do not remember ever 
picking up frostfish from the 
sand. We always sloshed 
around in the water where the 
waves ran less than a foot 
deep. We would catch the fish 
in the scapnets when they 
swam into range of the lan- 
tern light. Some people used 
eel spears, but we never owned 
any of those things. Others 
took them out of the water 
with ordinary garden rakes. 

One night we caught so 
manv that the little express 
waTon fairly groaned hauling 
them home. We decided to put 
some down in brine for use 
later on. My father cleaned 
tha fish and my mother salted 
them in a big stone crock. 
Something went wrong w'th 
the batch for thev spoiled. T 
know now what the troub'e 
was. The bones of frostfish. 
like those of bluefish and 
probably weakfish, will rot 
and turn to gelatin in contact 
with salt. 

Whiting are very easy to 
filet. After gutting and remov- 
ing the head, the fingers may 
be run down either side of the 
hackbone disengaging the 
flesh. The bone then 'i^ts out 
in one piece leavino- solid sides 
of meat. I am told there is a 
way of yanking the backbone 
out without first loosening it, 
but 1 have not lear-^ed to do 
the job this wav. The back- 
bone is almost the o"lv bo-^e 
in whiting and the others are 
easily found and removed be- 
fore eating. 

We usually pan-fry frost- 
fish although the chunks of 
meat make a wonderful chow- 
de»- along with sliced potatoes, 
o'-ions and a piece of salt pork. 
A little bacon fat helps to 
bring out the flavor. Whiting 
hold together better than you 
think when fried in deep fat. 

I do not know any way to 
predict the appearance" of 
frostfvsh. They are most abun- 
dant in November and early 
December — the frost months. 
They seem to come into the 
surf feeding on tiny moss- 
bunkers. Perhaps the surf wa- 
ter is colder than elsewhere as 
the frostfish become sluggish 
and dumb and unable to han- 



MARCH I95(i 

die themselves properly in the 
waves. 

The best night to frostfish J 

appears to be when a north- ■^ 
west wind has flattened down 
the Waves. Then there is not 
much churning and it is easier 
to see the fish in the shallow 
water. Also with such a wind 
the area to be watched is re- 
duced due to the wave-wash 
being held back by the wind. 
I do not believe the air tem- 
perature has to be unusually 
low to bring the frostfish into 
the shore. I think it is more a 
question of hunger and food 
supply. 

Frostfish do not like sun- 
light. They arrear, it seems, 
only after the coming of dark- 
ness and before the first hhits 
of daylight. I have never fished 
for them late at night but un- 
derstand they are just as 
plentiful as in the evening. 
Tomcods do not behave like 
the southshore frostfish. They 
are likely to set the little bells 
jingling any hour of he twen- 
ty-four. 

There is possibly another 
factor contributing to bring- ^ 
ing frostfish into the surf in 
the dark hours. The darkness 
is protection from enemies. If 
frostfish were cast up on the 
sand between waves in the 
daylight, sea gulls would 
pounce and promptly render 
the fish incanable of knowing 
or caring whether the next 
wave ever reached them. 

Frostfishing is good fun, 
and how you do sleep after a 
couple of hours of it! 



Treadmills 



I was interested in the letters 
about old treadmills in recent is- 
sues. I think I had written you 
some time ago about the one that 
used to travel around and do our 
threshing when I was a youngster 
down in Greenport. 

I enjoy the Forum very much 
and some of its articles have g-iven 
me the ideas for some of my stor- 
ies in our shop paper at the Bird 
Machine Co. 

Clifford O. Young 
Walpole R.F.D. 

Mass. 

Note: Mr. Young enclosed some 
clippings of his "yarns" from the 
shop paper. We wish he'd put us 
on his mailing list, for he is cer- 
tainly another Will Rogers when 
it comes to good rural humor. Edi. 



ss 




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LONG ISLAND LIGHTING COMPANY 



Wining and Dining 

in the Continental Tradition, 
superb, leisurely, inexpensive, 
will he yours to enjoy, at the 
entirely new 

RENDEZVOUS 

Restaurant 

292 M.rrick Rd. Amityville 
Phone AMItyvitU 4-9768 



ZIKOLL'S 

(§lh ffiaitbmark 3nn 

A place to relax — 
To dine at leisure in 
an atmosphere of yesteryear 

Neither exclusive 
nor expensive 

84S Merrick Road Copiague 
Tels. AMityville 4-1383-9815 



Hunt's 
Foster House 

Sayville Est. 1847 SA 4-1052 

MILDRED AND BILL HUNT 

Formerly of Hunt's, Farmingdale 

Serving the Same Good Food 

Weekday and Sunday Luncheon 

Dinner to') P.M. Closed Monday 

Saturdays 5:30 - 10:30 



STERN'S 

Pickle Products, Inc. 

Farmingdale, N. Y. 

Tels. 24S : Night 891 

Complete Line of Condiments for the 

Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries Quality Since 1890 

Factory conveniently located at 

Farmingdale 



Recalls "Tig-er Town" 

I remember that as a boy there 
was a small colony of decrepit 
homes on either side of Hendrick- 
son avenue in Valley Stream. The 
inore respectable element in the 
village called it Tig-er Town be- 
cause of the drinking, feuding and 
fighting that took place there all 
too frequently. Much of the time 
the residents of Tiger Town were 
unemployed, but occasionally they 
would find work with a very 
highly skilled "horsemover" who 
collected the dead animals, sold 
their hides for leather and the 
meat to a commercial trout pond 
on Dutch Broadway. Sometimes, 
however, the horsemeat was too 
"high" even for the fish, in which 
case it was generally dumped off 
in a nearby woods which made an 
ideal setting for crows, a boy and 
a gun. 

Tragedy came to Tiger Town on 
a beautiful Decoration Day morn- 
ing, back around 1900, when the 
11:20 a.m. train struck a tallyho 
loaded with young people from 
Brooklyn on a Sunday School out- 
ing. The high vehicle drawn by 
four horses was crossing the rail- 
road at Merrick road when the 
locomotive ploughed into it, killing 
five persons and injuring others. 

Several residents of Tiger Town 
were eye-witnesses to the tragedy 
and later served on the Coroner's 
jury. A roadhouse near the scene 
of the catastrophe soon thereafter 
adopted the name of The Tally Ho 
Inn as a grim reminder of the 
affair. 

Tiger Town, however, disap- 
peared a few years later when 
real estate developers acquired the 
property and dispossessed the ten- 
ants and squatters. Among the lat- 
ter were a father, mother and two 
daughters who chose a nearby 
railroad embankment, dug a cave 
and made it their home, like ani- 
mals in a burow, until expelled 
by the authorities. 

George E. Hart 
Wading River 



Breath of Fresh Air 

The Forum is like a breath of 
fresh air, and I would feel lost 
down here, without it. I wish you 
and the Forum a happy new year, 
and all the success possible. 

Louis T. Vail 
New Port Richey, Fla. 

Note: Mr. Vail is widely known 
as a student of New York State 
history and genealogy. Editor. 



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La Grange 

Montauk Highway East of Babylon 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. MOhawk 9-9800 



For the Sea Food 
Connoisseur It's 

SNAPPER 

INN 

on Connetquot River 
OAKDALE 

Phone SAyville 4-0248 
CLOSED MONDAYS 



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RESTAURANT 

EXCELLENT CUISINE 
Catering to Small Parties 

M. SWANSON 

AMityville 4-5858 and 4-9704 

Dawes Avenue 

and George Brown Plaza 

Amityville (East) 



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AMITYVILLE 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE 

BLUE POINT 



YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU TRIED 

LUNCHEON - DINNER (or SNACK) 

in the restful comfort of 

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where excellent food, skillfully prepared and promptly served, 
is primed to meet the better taste. 

123 Louden Avenue Tel. AMityville 4-4000 Amityville, L. I. 

"ASK YOUR FRIENDS WHO'VE TRIED IT"